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Comment for a Chance to Win a Free Pad Thai GrubKit


You could win everything you need to make pad thai, pre-measured and wrapped up in a box

If you've ever wanted to impress your friends at home with some homemade Thai food, here's your chance to whip up some pad thai without ever pulling out the measuring spoons (or freaking out about grabbing the right spices).

The Daily Meal has partnered with GrubKit to give out 13 pad thai kits, a nifty box that includes all the non-perishable ingredients to make pad thai at home. All the ingredients are pre-measured, so all you have to do is follow the recipe card.

To enter for your chance to win a free pad thai GrubKit (worth $21.95), sign in with an active email address and add your comments below, detailing your three favorite go-to ingredients. This promotion ends Monday, April 23.


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr


Recipe: Ultimate Vegan Pad Thai Noodles

Confession time. I'm a vegan food blogger who's really not that into tofu. I've never seen the appeal - it doesn't taste of much, slightly soggy texture, a faff to cook. Why bother? That is, until I tried tofu cooked 'properly' at Thai restaurants and then at Wagamama - suddenly the texture was beautiful, a really crispy coating with the spongy insides, literally soaking up all the flavours of the dish.

I needed to re-create this incredible tofu at home, and read that the way to achieve this amazing texture was to press all the liquid out of it. But oh, what a faff - the common method seemed to be squashing the tofu between two plates, weighted down with pans, tins or heavy books. I tried this once or twice, and the results were fairly good, but with water all over the worktop and tins falling off everywhere, this was never going to catch on.

Then an e-mail pinged in to my inbox from Ben, the inventor and manufacturer of the EZ Tofu Press who have just started selling in the UK and wondered if I would like to test one. Yes please!

You can see how I got on below - it is such a simple idea, just two sheets of tough food-safe plastic, with tough bolts which you tighten to increase the tension every few minutes, and simply squeeze the water out of your tofu, (which needs to be the firm or extra-firm variety, not silken). You can stand it upright on a plate like I did, or even stand it in the sink so the water runs straight down the plughole as it drains out. No mess, no spills, super easy and perfect crispy tofu!

Armed with my trusty tofu press, I was keen to re-create my all-time favourite tofu recipe, and the dish I order without fail every time I try a new Thai restaurant - vegan Pad Thai Noodles. Flat rice noodles, stir fried with beansprouts, tofu, chilli, spring onions and shallots, topped with peanuts, radish, fresh coriander and lime juice, with a 'sauce' of tamarind paste, sugar and a splash of vinegar. Sweet, sour and spicy - these are totally more-ish, tingling every single one of your taste buds with each forkful.

You can see above the really lovely texture of the tofu - crispy and spongy, soaking up all those lovely Thai flavours.

I've recommended in the recipe that you press and cook the tofu first, then prepare the vegetables and sauce whilst your noodles are soaking, so everything is ready to throw into the wok or pan for just a few minutes of fast and hot cooking time. Make sure the table is set to eat these immediately - these vegan pad thai noodles are at their very best served straight from the pan, with a fresh squeeze of lime juice.

Don't forget to pin the recipe for later, or to share with friends &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr &rarr